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Telehealth-news

ICU Telemedicine in Syria: a remarkable story


One story which neveimgresr made the mainstream press is  the humanitarian gesture of a group of ICU Telemedicine specialists providing civilian ICU care in war-torn Syria. Reported in the February issue of the Annals of American Thoracic Surgery, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The program utilized inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Launched in 2012 and within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. What would normally take numerous committee meetings including budgetary constraints was done on an all volunteer basis at a much lower than expected cost.

The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country.

The critical care community and the world will be waiting to see data from this extraordinary and courageous endeavor. Congratulations to Drs. Moughrabieh and Weinert from the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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Posted by: hrogove

Posted on: February 8th, 2016

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Telemedicine for home health care for ventilator patients


J Telemed Telecare. 2014 Dec;20(8):441-9. doi: 10.1177/1357633X14555620. Epub 2014 Oct 14.

Researchers from Boston Childrens/Harvard reported:

 WHAT? Was telemedicine  feasible in patients with special care needs on home ventilation, whether it affected the confidence of families about the clinical management of their child, and whether it supported clinical decision-making?
HOW? Videoconferencing software was provided free for 14 families who had a computer and webcam. Families completed questionnaires about clinical management before the addition of telemedicine and 2-3 months after they had used telemedicine. They also completed a questionnaire about their experience with videoconferencing. There were 27 telemedicine encounters during the 9-month study.
WHAT? Families reported:
  • Higher confidence in clinical care with telemedicine compared to telephone.
  • They also reported that the videoconferencing was high-quality, easy to use, and did not increase their telecommunication costs.
  • The telemedicine encounters supported clinical decision-making, especially in patients with active clinical problems or when the patient was acutely ill.
  • The telemedicine encounters prevented the need for 23 clinic visits, three emergency room visits, and probably one hospital admission.

Although the study was small, videoconferencing appears useful in the management of medically fragile patients on home ventilator support, producing high levels of family confidence in clinical management and value to clinicians in their decision-making.

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: October 9th, 2015

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Telemedicine for Pediatric Transport


imgresA group of pediatric intensivists at the duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington Delaware published the results of evaluating telephone versus telemedicine evaluation of pediatric patients with moderate to severe critical illness being transported between hospitals. Findings were as follows based upon the opinions of the medical command center physicians:

  • Connection and audio quality were equivalent and there were no dropped calls.
  • Average call duration in the phone group was 186 versus 139 seconds in the video group (P = 0.055).
  • The MCO survey results were the following: 100% found video intuitive, 92% felt that disposition based on phone report was difficult, 80% felt that video provided better understanding of patient condition, 70% felt that video assisted disposition, and 80% believe that video should be used for transport.
  • The iPad system offers a significant savings when compared with conventional telemedicine.

This was a prospective randomized study of a total of 50 patients divided between call only versus video conferencing. An iPad tablet was the technology used which the authors conclude is much more cost effective than other technologies.

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: September 6th, 2015

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Robotics in Telemedicine


In the just released itmj.2015.21.issue-9.coverssue of Telemedicine and e-Health, Doan and Merrell’s editorial addresses robotics in telemedicine. The editors write “Telemedicine, telehealth, and robotics are a few innovative approaches to alleviating the stress on an overburdened system. While technology continues its march forward, often unabated, the culture of medicine has not changed as rapidly. There are many individuals and health systems across the United States and the world that are reticent to change. Perhaps it is a lack of understanding or a fear of change or even a level of trust in the technology. Clearly a robot in a nursing facility that is driven by a remotely located physician who is in contact with the on-site nursing staff can add tremendous value. Robots have added value both in clinical settings and in the educational setting.”

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: September 1st, 2015

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Telemedicine Decreases ER Use by Seniors


imagesTelemed J E Health. 2015 Aug 7. [Epub ahead of print]

BACKGROUND:

The failure to provide timely acute illness care can lead to adverse consequences or emergency department (ED) use. We evaluated the effect on ED use of a high-intensity telemedicine program that provides acute illness care for senior living community (SLC) residents.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

  • We performed a prospective cohort study over 3.5 years.
  • Six SLCs cared for by a primary care geriatrics practice were intervention facilities, with the remaining 16 being controls.
  • Consenting patients at intervention facilities could access telemedicine for acute illness care.
  • Patients were provided patient-to-provider, real-time, or store-and-forward high-intensity telemedicine (i.e., technician-assisted with resources beyond simple videoconferencing) to diagnose and treat acute illnesses.
  • The primary outcome was the rate of ED use.

RESULTS:

  • We enrolled 494 of 705 (70.1%) subjects/proxies in the intervention group;
  • 1,058 subjects served as controls.
  • Control and intervention subjects visited the ED 2,238 and 725 times, respectively, with 47.3% of control and 43.4% of intervention group visits resulting in discharge home.
  • Among intervention subjects, ED use decreased at an annualized rate of 18% (rate ratio [RR]=0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-0.95), whereas in the control group there was no statistically significant change in ED use (RR=1.01; 95% CI, 0.95-1.07; p=0.009 for group-by-time interaction).
  • Primary care use and mortality were not significantly different.

CONCLUSIONS:

High-intensity telemedicine significantly reduced ED use among SLC residents without increasing other utilization or mortality. This alternative to traditional acute illness care can enhance access to acute illness care and should be integrated into population health programs.

COMMENT: A very nice introductory cohort study on a very pertinent topic. Hopefully to follow will be a prospective randomized study looking at both outcomes and financial data. Additionally, for those seen through telemedicine, following the ED admission course would be important. 

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: August 9th, 2015

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Reflecting upon ATA 2015 Annual Meeting


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Drs. Sanjay Gupta and Herb Rogove

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Drs. Herb Rogove and Patrick Soon-Shiong

At ATA 2015 (American Telemedicine Association), held in Los Angeles,  a milestone was achieved as over 5,000 attendees from around the world stormed the LA Convention Center. The content of the symposium keeps getting better, ranging from lightening rounds to superb plenary sessions. What particularly struck me was that the keynote speakers, both physicians in different areas of medicine both understood and support telemedicine as an integral part of healthcare delivery. Dr. Sanjay Gupta, chief CNN medical correspondent, had previously done a story on telemedicine featuring Yulun Wang, CEO of InTouch Health. Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, an entrepreneur and brilliant visionary, has already embarked upon ways to treat cancer utilizing mobile health. The exhibit hall allowed one to roam a roomy exhibit hall to see new and established medical product and software companies display and explain their technology. Based upon the opinion of those in attendance, the ATA is striving toward increasing the content experience. Looking optimistically to another high level meeting in Minnesota for ATA 2016.

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: June 19th, 2015

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MLK Jr Community Hospital will use C3O Telemedicine


MobileSmith is the App Platform of Choice for MLK Community Hospital Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital has chosen C3O Telemedicine to provide acute teleneurology coverage. Dr. Herb Rogove, CEO of C3O, says “we are extremely delighted to have been chosen as MLK Jr. Community Hospitals telemedicine service provider”. MLK has built their hospital with the 21st century in mind as they are a true telemedicine facility according to Rogove.

The key strengths of C3O are:

  • Rapid response times
  • A virtual who’s who of teleneurologists from leading medical centers
  • Proven achievement of quality metrics and excellent outcomes
  • Affordability

Located in the Second District of the Los Angeles County, the brand new Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital (MLKCH) is a priority project for local authorities. It is expected to serve 1.2 million residents from all over South Los Angeles and to create more than 900 jobs in the area.

MobileSmith is the provider for mobile apps.

“Our strategy is to get into mobile extremely quickly, without overly burdening our IT staff or infrastructure,” said Sajid Ahmed, Chief Information and Innovation Officer at MLKCH. “With its powerful capabilities and easy learning curve, the MobileSmith Platform is the ideal solution for us. We are looking forward to launching many great apps.”

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: June 17th, 2015

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Transfer of strokes to hub improves outcome?


J Telemed Telecare. 2015 May 10. pii: 1357633X15577531. [Epub ahead of print]
Yaghi S1, Harik SI2, Hinduja A2, Bianchi N2, Johnson DM2, Keyrouz SG2.
  • 1Department of Neurology and the AR Saves Program of the Center for Distant Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR shadiyaghi@yahoo.com.
  • 2Department of Neurology and the AR Saves Program of the Center for Distant Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of our study is to determine whether the transfer of patients to hub hospitals is beneficial.

METHODS:

  • Retrospectively analyzed data from our prospectively collected cohort in the AR SAVES (Stroke Assistance through Virtual Emergency Support) telestroke network from November 2008 till January 2012.
  • We compared the outcome of patients who were transferred to a “hub” with those who remained at the “spoke” hospital where thrombolysis took place.
  • We stratified patients according to stroke severity using admission NIHSS scores into two groups: patients with mild stroke (NIHSS <8) and those with moderate to severe stroke (NIHSS ≥8). We defined good outcome as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤2. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher’s exact test, two-tailed, and significance was considered at p < 0.05.

RESULTS:

  • Out of 894 telestroke consultations, 206 patients received thrombolytic therapy; 134 patients had moderate to severe strokes and 160 patients (78%) were transferred to the hub after thrombolytic therapy.
  • The percentage of patients with good outcome at 3 months was similar between patients transferred to hub and those who stayed at the spoke (61% vs. 55%, p = NS).
  • However, when only patients with moderate to severe strokes were analyzed, patients transferred to the hub were more likely to have good outcomes at three months post t-PA (50% versus 24%, p = 0.026).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with moderate to severe ischemic strokes who were treated with t-PA in a telestroke network may potentially benefit from expert care at a primary stroke center.

Telemedicine Implications:

Many tele-stroke programs are based upon the hub-spoke model. Often in rural hospitals without ICU’s the obvious course is to start tPA then transfer to a hub center. The question then comes up, for these less severe patients, do we still need to transfer them after tPA is given. In depth data on complications in this cohort needs to be reviewed. Outcomes as far as survival look very good.

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: May 16th, 2015

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ATA’s New Executive Board


IPRqUxyy_normal(PRWEB) May 14, 2015 — WASHINGTON- Thursday, May 14, 2015— The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) recently elected Reed V. Tuckson, MD, as President of the Association’s Board of Directors. Dr, Tuckson has been recognized among the 50 most influential physician executives and top 25 minority executives in healthcare. With a distinguished career that has spanned over 35 years, Tuckson has served in a variety of senior posts including the Senior Vice President for Professional Standards of the American Medical Association and the Executive Vice President and Chief of Medical Affairs for UnitedHealth Group. He is currently the Managing Director of Tuckson Health Connections.

Tuckson is joined by the following members of the Board’s executive committee: – President-Elect, LTG (Ret.) James Peake, MD, Senior Vice President, CGI Federal, former U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs and Surgeon General of the United States Army – Vice President, Peter Yellowlees, MD, MBBS, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis Health System – Secretary and Treasurer, Herb Rogove, DO, FCCM, FACP, President & CEO, C3O Telemedicine – Immediate Past President, Yulun Wang, PhD, Chairman & CEO, InTouch Health In addition, two other individuals recently joined the Board of Directors: – Amnon Gavish, ScD, Senior Vice President of Vertical Solutions, Vidyo, Inc.; Chair of ATA’s Industry Council – Kristi Henderson, DNP, NP-BC, FAEN, Chief Telehealth and Innovation Officer, the University of Mississippi Medical Center; Past Chair of ATA’s Institutional Council “We are pleased to announce the addition of this group of prestigious individuals to the Board and officers of this Association,” said Jonathan Linkous, CEO of ATA. “This reflects ATA intention to work with a balance of leaders from both the ranks of healthcare providers and industry in order to fulfil our goal to improve healthcare delivery through the use of telecommunications technology.” Other current at-large Board members include Ellen R. Cohn, PhD; Naomi Fried, PhD; Alexis Gilroy, JD; John Glaser, PhD; Julia L. Johnson, JD; Roy Schoenberg, MD; and Andrew R. Watson, MD.

About the American Telemedicine Association The American Telemedicine Association is the leading international resource and advocate promoting the use of advanced remote medical technologies. ATA and its diverse membership work to fully integrate telemedicine into healthcare systems to improve quality, equity and affordability of healthcare throughout the world. Established in 1993, ATA is headquartered in Washington, DC. For more information, visit www.americantelemed.org

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: May 16th, 2015

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mHealth and mental health


imgresAfter attending the ATA 2015 meeting in Los Angeles last week, one might be interested in the research  being done in mental health utilizing mobile devices for young patients. It appears that in the journal, Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netwjust published last fall, a review article appeared to address this issue. Only seventeen articles to date have been published and were discussed.

Four gaps in current knowledge were identified: the scarcity of studies conducted in low and middle income countries, the absence of information about the real-life feasibility of mobile tools, the need to address the issue of technical and health literacy of both young users and health professionals, and the need for critical discussion regarding diverse ethical issues associated with mobile phone use. The authors suggested that mHealth researchers and clinicians looking at mental health  carefully consider the ethical issues related to patient-practitioner relationship, best practices, and the logic of self-surveillance.

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Posted by: C3O Telemedicine News

Posted on: May 10th, 2015

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